Auto AU
Auto NZ
Sub-menu 1.2.1.1
Window Film
Consumer Advice
History
Glossary
Media releases
Articles
Facts & Stats

Types
Benefits
Warranty
Video
History
Terms
Brands
Home
Vehicle
Warnings
Home or Office
Vehicle
Installers
Flat Glass Exam Certified
WERS For Film Accredited
Sub-menu 1.2.1.1

History

Solar window film has been used to control heat within a building since the1960s.

Early films reflected the solar radiation back from a window, preventing the warming of interior surfaces, while still allowing vision through the glass.

As the concept was fine-tuned, demand developed for coloured solar control films, to complement the architectural vision. Early colours included bronze, grey, blue, green and gold.

The energy crisis of the early 1970s prompted an interest in another aspect of window film - the reduction of heat loss. It was discovered that polyester film absorbed and reradiated long wave infrared heat rather than act as a transparent medium. Through experimentation, new film materials and constructions were developed that enhanced this characteristic. These films greatly improved a room’s interior heat retention.

Timeline

1960

Gold/polyamide film was developed for the lunar project to reflect heat

1970

Adapted for use on building windows

  • Vapour coating process onto clear polyester film introduced 
  • Spray on mounting adhesive 
  • No scratch resistant coating 
  • Edge sealing

1970

EARLY…combination of dyed film with metal introduced, which reduced mirror appearance

1970

MID…introduction of mounting adhesive. Safety and security films with thick adhesive are launched

1970

LATE…introduction of scratch resistant coating

1980

Sputtering process (metals and alloys) is introduced

1990

Spectrally selective films are introduced, with high heat reduction and light transmission

 

In Australia...

1975

Application of reflective flat glass film to cars - WA

  • Silver 20% films used
  • Spliced rear screens
  • Sealing the edges

1980

EARLY…state regulations introduced 

  • Move to dyed (coloured) films with low reflectivity, to meet state regulations of: 70% VLT – front side windows and 35% VLT – rear side and rear windows

1980 - 1990

Rapid spread of automotive window tinting to other states in Australia

1990

EARLY…every state of Australia allows 35% VLT on side windows and rear screens and less than 10% external reflection

1993

LATE…introduction of scratch resistant coating

1980

The International Window Film Association (Australasia) is formed

2005

IWFAA changes its name to WFAANZ

2011

WERS For Film is launched in Australia


Copyright 2018 © Window Film Association of Australia and New Zealand. All rights reserved.
Phone: 02 9498 2768 | Email: info@wfaanz.org.au
Powered by Digital Revolution